Ischemic Heart Disease (CME)
Select a category to see the available seminars
Collapse Acute Coronary Syndromes (CME)

Purpose/ Objective

Coronary artery disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. There are several diagnostic examinations for the clinician to choose from to aid in assessing coronary disease. The advanced technology of cardiac MRI continues progress, making it difficult to stay abreast as to the advantages and pitfalls of this modality. Following this activity, learners will become aware of the advantages of using cardiac MRI for the assessment of coronary artery disease and understand the utilization of cardiac MRI for evaluation of myocardial edema.

 

Accreditation Statement

The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

 

Credit Designation Statement

The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

 

Instructions for Claiming CME

  • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
  • Complete the post-activity evaluation
  • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

 

Financial Disclosures

The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose, unless listed below:
Dr. Friedrich and spouse has received consulting fees from and has stocks in Circle CV Imaging.
Dr. Bucciarelli-Ducci has received consulting fees and/or honoraria from Circle Cardiovascular Imaging, Inc. She also is an expert witness for Brachers LLP.
Dr. Raman has received grant and/or research funding from Novartis and Siemens Healthcare. She has equity interest in EXCMR, Inc.

Any resulting conflicts of interest were resolved prior to the start of the activity according to ACCME Criteria & Standards.

 

Disclosure of Commercial Support

SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

 

Bibliography

  1. Kloner et al., Circulation 2001; 104:2981-89
  2. Ferreira et al., JACC Imaging 2013; 6:1048-58. Hinojar et al., JACC Imaging 2015; 8:37-46
  3. Marholdt H, et al., EHS 2005; 26:1461-74
  4. Tahir et al., Radiology 2012 285(1); 83-92
  5. Tahir et al., Radiology 2012 285(1); 83-92
  6. Srichai et al., Invest. Radiol. 2013; 48(1) 24-31
  7. Bingham and Hachamovitch Circulation 2011; 123:1509-18
  8. Srichai et al., Invest. Radiol., 2013
  9. Abdel-Aty et al., JACC 2009
  10. Dall’Armellina et al., Circ Cardiovasc Imaging. 2011; 4:228-236

 

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Course Date: May 01, 2018

Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1.25 hours Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER Acute Coronary Syndromes (CME)
    Collapse Microvascular Obstruction (CME)

    Purpose/ Objective

    The course will help in identifying Microvascular Obstruction and help in understanding the importance of it. Following this activity, learners will understand the importance of and be able to identify Microvascular Obstruction and intramyocardial haemorrhage from CMR scans and identify measures to reduce the Microvascular Obstruction.

     

    Accreditation Statement

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Credit Designation Statement

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    Instructions for Claiming CME

    • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
    • Complete the post-activity evaluation
    • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

     

    Financial Disclosures

    The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relationships to disclose.

     

    Disclosure of Commercial Support

    SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

     

    Bibliography

    1. Eitel I, Kubusch K, Strohm O, Desch S, Mikami Y, de Waha S, Gutberlet M, Schuler G, Friedrich MG, Thiele H. Prognostic value and determinants of a hypointense infarct core in T2-weighted cardiac magnetic resonance in acute reperfused ST-elevation-myocardial infarction. Circ Cardiovasc Imaging [Internet]. American Heart Association, Inc.; 2011 Jul 1 [cited 2018 Mar 26];4(4):354–62. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21518773
    2. Wu KC. CMR of microvascular obstruction and hemorrhage in myocardial infarction. J Cardiovasc Magn Reson [Internet]. BioMed Central; 2012 Sep 29 [cited 2018 Mar 26];14(1):68. Available from: http://jcmr-online.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1532-429X-14-68
    3. Carrick D, Haig C, Rauhalammi S, Ahmed N, Mordi I, McEntegart M, Petrie MC, Eteiba H, Hood S, Watkins S, Lindsay M, Mahrous A, Ford I, Tzemos N, Sattar N, Welsh P, Radjenovic A, Oldroyd KG, Berry C. Prognostic significance of infarct core pathology revealed by quantitative non-contrast in comparison with contrast cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in reperfused ST-elevation myocardial infarction survivors. Eur Heart J [Internet]. Oxford University Press; 2016 Apr 1 [cited 2016 Sep 26];37(13):1044–59. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26261290
    4. Abbas A, Matthews GH, Brown IW, Shambrook JS, Peebles CR, Harden SP. Cardiac MR assessment of microvascular obstruction. Br J Radiol [Internet]. British Institute of Radiology; 2015 [cited 2018 Mar 26];88(1047). Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4651190/
    5. Mather AN, Lockie T, Nagel E, Marber M, Perera D, Redwood S, Radjenovic A, Saha A, Greenwood JP, Plein S. Appearance of microvascular obstruction on high resolution first-pass perfusion, early and late gadolinium enhancement CMR in patients with acute myocardial infarction. J Cardiovasc Magn Reson [Internet]. 2009 Aug 21 [cited 2018 Mar 26];11(1):33. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19698105
    6. Carberry J, Carrick D, Haig C, Ahmed N, Mordi I, McEntegart M, Petrie MC, Eteiba H, Hood S, Watkins S, Lindsay M, Davie A, Mahrous A, Ford I, Sattar N, Welsh P, Radjenovic A, Oldroyd KG, Berry C. Persistent Iron Within the Infarct Core After ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction: Implications for Left Ventricular Remodeling and Health Outcomes. JACC Cardiovasc Imaging [Internet]. Elsevier; 2017 Nov 15 [cited 2018 Mar 26]; Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1936878X17309166?via%3Dihub#bib20
    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Course Date: May 01, 2018

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 0.50 hours Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER Microvascular Obstruction (CME)
    Collapse Chronic Myocardial Infarction & Viability (CME)

    Purpose/ Objective

    CMR is a very specialized imaging modality that is not widely available. More and more medical centers are starting to do CMRs.  Thus, basic knowledge is necessary.  One of the most common requests for CMR is the assessment of viability (scar tissue) in patients with chronic myocardial infarction.  By understanding how to optimize the images for myocardial scar, this can improve how a patient is being cared for in the type of revascularization being offered. Following this activity, learners will be able to improve image quality (e.g. utilizing phase sensitive inversion recovery, changing parameters that improves temporal resolution to minimize cardiac motion artifacts and understand the extent of transmurality late gadolinium enhancement on recovery of function with revascularization

     

    Accreditation Statement

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Credit Designation Statement

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of  1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    Instructions for Claiming CME

    • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
    • Complete the post-activity evaluation
    • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

     

    Financial Disclosures

    The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose, unless listed below:
    Dr. Nagel grant and/or reseach supprot from Bayer Healthcare and Philips Healthcare. Dr. Nagel has received Speaker's Bureau fees from Bater Healthcare.

    Any resulting conflicts of interest were resolved prior to the start of the activity according to ACCME Criteria & Standards.

     

    Disclosure of Commercial Support

    SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

     

    Bibliography

    STICH Trial (SPECT, dobutamine echo). Bonow RO et al, N Engl J Med 2011;364:1617-1625

    MultiContrast Delayed Enhancement (MCODE) improves detection of subendocardial myocardial infarction by late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance: a clinical validation study. Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 2012 14:83 Published on: 30 November 2012

    Contrast CMR In Chronic MI: Kim RJ et al, NEJM 2000;343:1445-53

    Contrast CMR In Acute MI: Beek et al. J Am Coll Cardiol 2003;42:895-901

    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Course Date: April 01, 2018

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1.50 hours Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER Chronic Myocardial Infarction & Viability (CME)
    Collapse Coronary Imaging (CME)

    Purpose/ Objective

    Cardiac MRI is a useful tool in diagnosing various cardiac pathologies.  Healthcare providers must be educated on the role of cardiac MRI in clinical practice in the appropriate patient. Following this activity, learners will be educated on the role of cardiac MRI in coronary imaging as well as the in-depth details regarding various cardiac sequences that are employed in cardiac MRI.

     

    Accreditation Statement

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Credit Designation Statement

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    Instructions for Claiming CME

    • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
    • Complete the post-activity evaluation
    • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

     

    Financial Disclosures

    The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose, unless listed below:
    Dr. Li has received Grant/Research Support from Siemens.

    Any resulting conflicts of interest were resolved prior to the start of the activity according to ACCME Criteria & Standards.

     

    Disclosure of Commercial Support

    SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

     

    Bibliography

    • Favad et al. Circulation, 2000
    • Bomar et al. Circulation, 2000
    • Kim et al. Circulation, 2002
    • Yeon et al. JACC, 2007
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    • Kawasaki et al. JACC Imaging, 2000
    • Noughcht et al. JACC, 2014
    • Botnar RM et al. Magn Reson Med, 2001
    • Kim WY et al. Circulation, 2002
    • Desai MY et al. Eur Heart J, 2005
    • Kim WY et al. Circulation, 2007
    • He Y et al. J Magn Reson Imaging, 2012
    • Giulia Ginami, CVMR Lausanne
    • Henningsson M and Botnar R, MRM, 2015
    • Gastao Cruz, SCMR, 2016
    • Jansen CHP et al. Circulation, 2011
    • Noguchi T et al. JACC, 2014
    • Noguchi T et al. JACC Imaging, 2015
    • Xie Y, Li D. et al. ‘Time-efficient whole-heart coronary plaque characterization with simultaneously acquired MRA”, ISMRM, 2015
    • Christian Jansen, KCL
    • Al-Mashhadi, Rozh H et al. Science Translational Medicine, 2013
    • Al-Mashhadi, Rozh H et al. AHA, 2014
    • Ehman et al. Radiology, 1989;173:255-63
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    • Brittain JH, et al. Magn Reson Med, 1995;33:689-96
    • Botnar RM, et al. Circulation, 1999;99:3139-48
    • Ferneira et al. JCMR, 2013;15(1):41,
    • Bomert P, Stuber M, Bontar RM, et al. Magn Reson Med, 2001;46:789-94
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    • Q Yang, K Li, Beijing
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    • Henningsson M, Botnar RM et al Magn Reson Med, 2012;67:437-445
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    • Addy NO et al SCMR, 2014;p380
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    • Pang et al. MRM, 2013
    • Pang J, Li D et al MRM, 2013
    • Bhat H, Li D et al MRM, 2011;65:1269-1277
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    • H Sakuma, Mie University Hospital, Japan
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    • Pag et al. Mag Reson Med, 2014
    • Akcakaya, Manning, Nezafat et al. MRM, 2013
    • Ahmed Gharib, Matthias Stuber, Roderic Pettigrew, NIH
    • Raman F, Blemke DA et al. Int J Cardiovasc Imaging, 2013
    • Hu, Manning, Nezafat Radiology, 2010
    • S. van Elderen et al. Radiology. 2010 Oct;257(1):254-9
    • Bettencourt N et al. Circ Cardiovasc Imaging, Online July 5, 2013
    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Course Date: April 01, 2018

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1 hour Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER Coronary Imaging (CME)
    Collapse Myocardial Perfusion and Quantification (CME)

    Purpose/ Objective

    Over the past few decades, cardiac MRI has evolved from its role as a research tool to a fundamental instrument in clinical cardiology.  That being said cardiac MRI is still perceived as a niche tool, and many clinicians still perceive cardiac MRI as prohibitively time consuming, expensive, and adding little incremental value.

     

    These perceptions can be addressed by wider availability of educational materials and introduction of these materials earlier in the resident or fellow's training course.

     

    Following the session, learners will be better prepared to utilize cardiac MRI in myocardial perfusion.  Learners will have increased their understanding in the:


    1.  Technical aspects of image acquisition
    2.  Pharmacologic properties of stress agents used in myocardial perfusion in MRI
    3.  Basics of image interpretation

     

    Accreditation Statement

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Credit Designation Statement

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    Instructions for Claiming CME

    • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
    • Complete the post-activity evaluation
    • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

     

    Financial Disclosures

    The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose, unless listed below:
    Dr. DiBella has received grant and/or research support from Siemens Healthcare.
    Dr. Arai has received other financial benefit from Siemens and Toshiba along with research grants from Bayer.

    Any resulting conflicts of interest were resolved prior to the start of the activity according to ACCME Criteria & Standards.

     

    Disclosure of Commercial Support

    SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

     

    Bibliography

    • Jespersen L et al. Eur Heart J, 2012;33:734-744
    • Khuddus MA et al. J Interv Cardiol, 2010;23(6):511-9
    • De Bruyne B et al. Circulation, 2001;104:2401-6
    • Bittencourt, Circulation CV Imaging, 2014
    • Maddox et al. JAMA, 2014
    • Murthy et al. Circulation, 2011
    • Murthy VL et al. JNM, 2014: 2014;55:1952-8
    • Taqueti & Di Carli, Curr Probl Cardiol, 2016
    • Murthy VL et al. Circulation, 2011;124:2215-24
    • Herzog et al. JACC 2009;54:150
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    • Naya et al. JNM, 2014;55:248-55
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    • Jerosch-Herold, M Medical Physics, 1998
    • Lee et al. Circulation, 2004;110:58
    • Salerno M et al. Circ CV Imaging, 2009;2:412-424
    • Christian et al. Radiology, 2004
    • Mordini F et al. JACC CV Imaging, 2014
    • Lockie T et al. JACC, 2011;57:70
    • Kuhl HP et al. AM J Cardio, 2007;99:1090
    • Patel AR et al. JACC, 2010;56:561
    • Hsu et al. JACC CV Imaging, 2012
    • Biglands JD et al. JCMR, 2012;14:1-40
    • Patel A et al. J Am Coll Cardio, 2010;56:561-569
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    • Ishida M et al. JCMR, 2011;13:2
    • Jerosch-Herold M, JCMR, 2010 Oct 8;12:57
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    • Jerosch-Herold M et al. Investigative Radiology, 2008;43:55-161
    • Stringola S et al. JACC Cardiovasc Imaging, 2011 Apr;4(4):402-12
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    • Lockie T et al. JACC, 2012;57:70-75
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    • Karolinska, Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) Group, Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden
    • Barts Heart Centre, The Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging Unit, London, UK
    • Henrik Engblom, Anthony Aletras, Marcus Carlsson, Hakan Arheden, Lund Cardica MR Group, Center for Medical Imaging and Physiology, Skane University Hospital, Lund, Sweden
    • Raquel Themudo, Jannike Nickander, Martin Ugander, Karolinska, Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) Group, Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden
    • Kris Knott, James Moon, Barts Heart Centre, The Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging Unit, London, UK
    • Jiang et al. Heart Long Circ, 2016;S1443-9506
    • Li et al. JACC-CI, 2014;7:1098-105
    • Hamon et al JCMR, 2010;12:29
    • Manka et al. Circ Cardiovasc Imaging, 2015
    • Fait et al. “Rapid, Efficient Imaging: Free-breathing 3D whole-heart stress myocardial perfusion using reordered compressed sensing”, Powerpitch Sat SCMR
    • Yang and Salerno et al. UVA
    • Yutzy et al. MRM, 2011;65:1630-7
    • Adituru et al. ISMRM, 2016
    • Harrison et al. HCMR, 2013;15(1):26
    • Bieging et al. “Rapid Rest/Stress Regadenoson Ungated Perfusion CMR for Detection of Cornoary Artery Disease in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation”, submitted
    • Sharif B et al. MRM, 2015
    • Sharif B et al. SCMR 2016 & ACC 2016
    • Adluru et al. “Ungated myocardial perfusion imaging with complete left ventricular coverage using radial simultaneous multi-slice imaging” ISMR, 2017
    • Kober et al. JCMR, 2016;18:22
    • Liu et al. JACC-CI, 2016;9:27-36
    • Bevilacqua et al. TMI, 2016;35:282-93
    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Course Date: April 01, 2018

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1 hour Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER Myocardial Perfusion and Quantification (CME)
    Collapse Stress Testing (CME)

    Purpose/ Objective

     

    CMR Stress Perfusion Imaging is clinically underutilized despite growing amount of clinical evidence to support its high diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value in risk stratifying patients with cardiovascular disease.  Cardiologists and other providers are currently limited in their ability to access and acquire methodological and technical training in stress CMR due to the relatively smaller number of centers which can offer this technical expertise.  As a result, cardiologists and non-cardiologists have limited exposure to training in this modality. After completing the activity learners will:

    1. Understand the technical methods and pitfalls of CMR stress imaging and how to safely conduct a CMR stress imaging exam.
    2. Place into context an evidence-based understanding of the diagnostic accuracy and prognostic information gained from a CMR stress imaging exam compared to other functional stress and anatomic imaging modalities for coronary artery disease assessment.
    3. Utilize the results from a CMR stress imaging exam to risk stratify patients with cardiovascular disease.
    4. Use ischemia and viability information obtained from a stress CMR exam to guide revascularization and/or clinical management.

     

    Accreditation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Credit Designation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    Instructions for Claiming CME

     

    • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
    • Complete the post-activity evaluation
    • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

     

    Financial Disclosures

     

    The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose, unless listed below:
     

    Dr. Al-Lamee received an honorarium from Philips Volcano.

    Dr. Arai research support from Siemens Medical Solutions and Bayer Healthcare.

    Dr. Nagel received an honorarium from Bayer Healthcare and Siemens Healthcare.

     

    Any resulting conflicts of interest were resolved prior to the start of the activity according to ACCME Criteria & Standards.

     

    Disclosure of Commercial Support

     

    SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

     

    Bibliography

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    • Messroghli D et al MRM 2004
    • Bonow R et al NEJM 2011
    • Velazquez EJ Bonow RO JACC 2015;65(6):615-24
    • Bax JJ et al J Nucl Cardiol 2015
    • Hammer-Hansen, S et al Eur Heart J CV Imaging 2016
    • Choi KM et al Circulation 2001
    • Beek AM et al JACC 2003
    • Danad et al Eur Heart J. 2017 Apr 1;38(13):991-998
    • Hachamovitch R e al Circulation 2003
    • Patel AR et al JACC 2010;56:561
    • Mordini F et al JACC CV Imaging 2014
    • Sammutt EC et al JACC CVI 2018
    • Ismail T et al JCMR 2014, 14:49
    • Hsu LY et al (in press 2018)
    • Khan T et al Eur Heart J 2017
    • Liu A et al JACC CVI 2016
    • Motwani M et al Heart 2017;0:1-7
    • Greenwood JP et al Lancet. 2012 Feb 4; 379(9814): 453–460
    • Li et al JACC imaging 2014
    • Jahnke C et al Circualtion 2007;115(13):1769-76
    • Motwani et al Circ Cardiovasc Imaging 2013
    • Motwani et al Heart 2017
    • Kellman P and Arai A JCMR 2007;9:525-537
    • The International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging April 2011, Vol 27, Issues 4, pp 557-562
    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Course Date: January 01, 2019

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 2.00 hours Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER Stress Testing (CME)
    Collapse General CMR in Ischemic Heart Disease (CME)

    Purpose/ Objective

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has unique capabilities in assessing cardiac anatomic structure, function, ischemia, and infarction.  The lack of ionizing radiation and lack of use of iodinated contrast media also has increased the utilization of CMR as a desirable advanced imaging modality. This will help cardiovascular professionals in the usage, performance, and utilization of CMR in the area of ischemic heart disease. Following this session, learners will be better prepared to understand and provide CMR assessment for the referring question of interest - i.e. presence/absence of ischemia, presence/absence/degree of myocardial viability and provide CMR assessment in structure and function to assist in optimal medical management of ischemic heart disease.

     

    Accreditation Statement

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Credit Designation Statement

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    Instructions for Claiming CME

    • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
    • Complete the post-activity evaluation
    • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

     

    Financial Disclosures

    The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose, unless listed below:
    Dr. Bucciarelli-Ducci has received consulting fees and/or honoraria from Circle Cardiovascular Imaging, Inc. She also is an expert witness for Brachers, LLP.
    Dr. Berry has received consulting fees and/or honoraria from AstraZeneca and from St. Jude Medical Center.

    Any resulting conflicts of interest were resolved prior to the start of the activity according to ACCME Criteria & Standards.

     

    Disclosure of Commercial Support

    SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

     

    Bibliography

    1. Bejan, GC, Ceck, CD. Modern risk stratification in coronary artery disease. Journal of Medicine and Life. 2011: Vol 4 (4):377-386.
    2. Aye, T and Graham, R. Risk stratification in stable coronary artery disease. Continuing Cardiology Education. 2017;3(1).
    3. Ragupathi, L and Pavri, BB. Tools for risk stratification of sudden cardiac death: a review of the literature in different patient populations.  Indian Health Journal. 2014:66:571-581.
    4. 2014 ESC/EACTS Guidelines on myocardial revascularization: The Task Force on Myocardial Revascularization of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTSEuropean Heart Journal, Volume 35, Issue 37, 1 October 2014, Pages 2541–2619.
    5. 2013 ESC guidelines on the management of stable coronary artery disease: The Task Force on the management of stable coronary artery disease of the European Society of Cardiology European Heart Journal, Volume 35, Issue 33, 1 September 2014, Pages 2260–2261.
    6. Kim RJ, Wu E, Rafael A, Chen EL, Parker MA, Simonetti ,O, et al. The use of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging to identify reversible myocardial dysfunction. N Engl J Med. 2000 Nov 16;343(20):1445–53. [PubMed]
    7. Kim, HW, Rehwald, WG, Wendell, DC, Jenista, ER, van Assche, L, Jensen, CJ, Chen, E, Parker, MA, and Kim, RJ.  Flow-Independent Dark-blood DeLayed Enhancement (FIDDLE): validation of a novel black blood technique for the diagnosis of myocardial infarction. JCMR 2016: 18(Suppl 1):O55.
    8. Kim, HW, Rehwald, WG, Jenista, ER, Wendell, DC, Filev, P, van Assche, L, Jensen, CJ, Parker, MA, Chen, E, Crowley, ALC, Klem, I, Judd, RM, and Kim, RJ.  Dark-Blood enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance of myocardial infarction.  JACC CV Imaging. 2017. In press, available online 13 Dec 2017.
    9. Velazquez EJ, Lee KL, Deja MA, Jain A, Sopko G, Marchenko A, et al. Coronary-artery bypass surgery in patients with left ventricular dysfunction. New Engl J Med. 2011 Apr 28;364(17):1607–16.
    10. Lockie, T, Nagel, E, Redwood, S, and Plein, S. Use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in acute coronary syndromes. Circulation. 2009; 119:1671-1681.
    11. Klem, I, Heitner, JF, Shah, DJ, Sketch, MH, Behar, V, Weinsaft, J, Cawley, P, Parker, M, Elliott, M, Judd, RM, and Kim, RJ.  Improved detection of coronary artery disease by stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance with the use of delayed enhancement infarction imaging. JACC 2006;47:1630-8.
    12. Salerno, M, Kramer, CM. Advances in parametric mapping with CMR imaging. JACC CV Imaging 2013:6(7):806-22.
    13. Messroghli, DR, Moon, JC, Ferreira, VM, Grosse-Wortmann, L, He, T, Kellman, P, Mascherbauer, J, Nezafat, R, Salerno, M, Schelbert, EB, Taylor, AJ, Thompson, R, Ugander, M, van Heeswijk, RB, and Friedrich, MG. Clinical recommendations for cardiovascular magnetic resonance mapping of T1, T2, T2*, and extracellular volume: a consensus statement by the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) endorsed by the European Association for Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI).  JCMR 2017;19:75.
    14. Diamond, GA and Forrester, JS. Analysis of probability as an aid in the clinical diagnosis of coronary artery disease. N Engl J Med 1979; 300:1350-1358.
    15. Motwani, M, MAredia, N, Fairbairn, TA, Kozerke, S, Greenwood, JP, and Plein, S. Assessment of ischaemic burden in angiographic three-vessel coronary artery disease with high-resolution cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging.  European Heart J- CV Imaging. 2014:15(6);701-708.
    16. Wellnhofer, E, Olariu, A, Klein, C, Grafe, M, Wahl, A, Fleck, E, and Nagel, E.  Magnetic resonance low-dose dobutamine test is superior to scar quantification for the prediction of functional recovery. Circulation. 2004:109:2172-2174.
    17. Chotenimitkhun, R, and Hundley, WG. Pharmacologic Stress Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance. Postgrad Med 2011 May 123(3):162-170.
    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Course Date: May 01, 2018

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1.25 hours Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER General CMR in Ischemic Heart Disease (CME)