Congenital Heart Disease (CME)
Select a category to see the available seminars
Collapse Aortic coarctation (CME)

Purpose/ Objective

 

Coarctation of the aorta is one form of congenital heart disease where standard non-invasive imaging techniques such as transthoracic echocardiography may not be able to fully characterize the underlying anatomy and presence of associated lesions. This is particularly true in older or larger patients, and in those patients who have undergone prior coarctation repair, whether if by surgical or transcatheter approaches.  When performed with attention to certain details, and using some novel techniques, CMR can improve the clinician’s understanding of the anatomy and resultant physiology in patients with coarctation of the aorta both prior to and following surgical repair. Following this activity, learns will understand the role of CMR in the management of coarctation of aorta, about novel CMR techniques for assessing coarctation of aorta, and will be able to discuss protocol for a CMR exam in coarctation of aorta.

 

Accreditation Statement

 

The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

 

Credit Designation Statement

 

The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

 

Instructions for Claiming CME

 

  • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
  • Complete the post-activity evaluation
  • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

 

Financial Disclosures

 

The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose.

 

Disclosure of Commercial Support

 

SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

 

Bibliography

  • Nieisen et al. Circulation 2005
  • Valverde et al. Catheter Cardiovasc Interv 2015;85:1006-16
  • Cosentino et al. Eurointervention 2015;11:669-72
  • Dillman et al. AJR 2008;190:1467-1474
  • Dorfman and Geva JCMR 2006;8(4):645-59
  • Kilner et al. Circulation 1993;87:1239
  • Sondergaard et al. Am Heart J 1993;126:1156
  • Heidenreich et al. Am J Cardiol 1995;75:265
  • Steffans et al. Circulation 1994;90:937-943
  • Holmquist et al. JMRI 2002;15:39-46
  • Nielson et al. Circulation 2005;111:622-628
  • Araoz et al JMRI 2003;17:177-183
  • ACC/AHA 2008 Guidelines for Adults with CHD Circulation 2008;118:e714-e833
  • Hom JJ, Ordovas KG, Reddy GP RadioGraphics 2008;28:407-416
  • Carlos Riquelme, Jean-Pierre Laissy, David Menegazzo et al. JMRI 1999, Vol 17(1):37-46
  • EG Mühler, JM Neuerburg, A Rüben, et al. Br Heart J 1993 Sep;70(2):285-290
  • Gunthard J, Buser P, Miettunen R. Angiology 1996;47:1073-80
  • Reddy, Higgins: Cardiac MR Imaging CD-ROM; Lippincoft 2000
  • Steffens JC, Bourne MW, Sakuma H, O’Sullivan M, Higgins CB Circulation 1994 Aug;90(2):937-43
  • Araoz PA, Reddy GP, Tarnoff H et al. JMRI 2003;17(2):177-83
  • Nielsen JC, Powell AJ, Gauvreau K, et al. Circualtion 2005;111:622-8
  • Muzzarelli SL, Ordovas KG, Hope MD, et al JCMR 2001;33:1440-1446
  • Muzzarelli SL, Meadows AK, Ordovas KG, Hope MD, Higgins CB, Nielsen JC, Geva T, Meadows JJ Am J Cardiol 2011 Nov 1:108(9):1335-40
  • Hope MD, Meadows AK, Hope T, Ordovas KG et al. Circualtion 2008;117:2818-2819
  • Ordovas K, Keedy A, Naeger D, et al. JCMR 2012; suppl 1:112-113
  • Celermajer DS, Greaves K Heart 2002;88:113-114
  • Celerrmajer DC, Deanfield JE Br Heart J 1993;69:539-43
  • Cohen M. et al. Circulation 1989;80:840-5
  • Presbitero P et al. Br Heart J 1987;57:462-7
  • Backer CL et al. Circulation 1995;92:II132-6
  • O’Sullivan JJ et al. Heart 2002;88:163-6
  • Simsolo R. et al. Am Heart J 1988;115:1268-73
  • Gardiner HM et al. Circulation 1994;89:1745-50
  • Struber M et al. JACC 1999;34:524-531
  • Botnar RM et al. Circulation 1999;3139-1348
  • Beerbaum P, Greil et al. Circulation 2004;13:110(2):163-169
  • Uribe S et al. Radiology 08/2008:248(2):606-14
  • Hussain T, Greil GF Radiology 2012 May;263(2):547-54
  • Makowski M, Greil G, Radiology 201;260(3):680-688
  • Allen B et al. EHJ October 2012, epub ahead of print
  • LaDisa, Figueroa et al. J Biomech Eng 2011
  • Hussain T et al. JMRI 2011 Aug;34(2):279-85
  • S. Kislinskiy, et al. Simulation of Congenital Heart Defect Corrective Surgeries Using Thin Shell Elements. Computational Biomechanics for Medicine: Models Algorithms and Implementation. Springer New York. Heidelberg Dordrecht London 2013

 

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Course Date: June 01, 2018

Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1.25 hours Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER Aortic coarctation (CME)
    Collapse Borderline Small Left Ventricle (CME)

    Purpose/ Objective

    Borderline left ventricle is a challenging condition with limited data to guide management with regard to pursuing a biventricular repair vs univentricular circulation. What is the ideal state/ if the problem is gone? We would have multi modality imaging criteria that would accurately predict outcomes for a given patient if biventricular or univentricular approaches are pursued enabling us to make the right decision for each individual patient.

    Following this session learners will understand:

    1. It is feasible to assess patients with borderline LV with CMR

    2. That LVEDVi assessed from echo is underestimated and a comprehensive CMR assessment would enable better patient selection to pursue biventricular approach.

     

    Planning Committee Members

     

    Aswathy Vaikom House

     

    Accreditation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Credit Designation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    Instructions for Claiming CME

     

    • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
    • Complete the post-activity evaluation
    • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

     

    Financial Disclosures

     

    The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose.

     

    Any resulting conflicts of interest were resolved prior to the start of the activity according to ACCME Criteria & Standards.

     

    Disclosure of Commercial Support

     

    SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

     

    Bibliography

    • Banka, P., Schaetzle, B., Komarlu, R. et al. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance parameters associated with early transplant-free survival in children with small left hearts following conversion from a univentricular to biventricular circulation. J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 16, 73 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12968-014-0073-1
    • Lars Grosse-Wortmann, Tae-Jin Yun, Osman Al-Radi, Siho Kim, Masaki Nii, Kyong-Jin Lee, Andrew Redington, Shi-Joon Yoo, Glen van Arsdell, Borderline hypoplasia of the left ventricle in neonates: Insights for decision-making from functional assessment with magnetic resonance imaging, The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Volume 136, Issue 6, 2008
    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Course Date: March 06, 2020

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1 hour Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER Borderline Small Left Ventricle (CME)
    Collapse Septal Defects and Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Drainage (CME)

    Purpose/ Objective

     

    Many forms of congenital heart disease include the presence of atrial and/or ventricular septal defects, or may include the presence of anomalous pulmonary venous drainage.  Standard non-invasive imaging techniques such as transthoracic echocardiography may not completely characterize the underlying anatomy and physiology in patients with these forms of congenital heart disease, whether prior to or following repair. When performed with attention to certain details, and using some novel techniques, CMR can improve the clinician’s understanding of the anatomy and resultant physiology in patients with septal defects and/or anomalous pulmonary venous drainage, both prior to and following surgical repair. Following this activity, learns be able to define what constitutes a cardiac shunt: left to right shunts, right to left shunts, understand CMR diagnosis (anatomic and physiologic) of congenital abnormalities of the pulmonary arteries and veins, as well as abnormalities in pulmonary arteries and veins following surgical repair of congenital heart disease lesions, and know how to calculate residual cardiac shunts by CMR in patients following surgical repair of congenital heart disease.

     

    Accreditation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Credit Designation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    Instructions for Claiming CME

     

    • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
    • Complete the post-activity evaluation
    • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

     

    Financial Disclosures

     

    The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose.

     

    Disclosure of Commercial Support

     

    SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

     

    Bibliography

    • Case 1B Courtesy of Albert Hsiao, MD, PhD

     

    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Course Date: June 01, 2018

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 0.75 hours Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER Septal Defects and Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Drainage (CME)
    Collapse Tetralogy of Fallot (CME)

    Purpose/ Objective

     

    The pathophysiology of repaired TOF is complex. Patients often tolerate the chronic volume load imposed by pulmonary regurgitation and, in some patients, by tricuspid regurgitation and residual intracardiac shunt(s), for many years. In other patients, the pathophysiology is further complicated by abnormalities in the pulmonary arterial tree. Over time, however, the risks of ventricular dysfunction, exercise intolerance, heart failure symptoms, arrhythmias, and death increase substantially. CMR has evolved to become a crucial diagnostic tool in this growing patient population. Following this activity, learners will understand the role of CMR in the management of tetralogy of Fallot, novel CMR techniques for assessing tetralogy of Fallot and be able to discuss protocol for a CMR exam in tetralogy of Fallot.

     

    Accreditation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Credit Designation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    Instructions for Claiming CME

     

    • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
    • Complete the post-activity evaluation
    • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

     

    Financial Disclosures

     

    The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose, unless listed below:
     

    Dr. Kroft received research support from Bayer Schering Pharma, Siemens and Philips.

     

    Any resulting conflicts of interest were resolved prior to the start of the activity according to ACCME Criteria & Standards.

     

    Disclosure of Commercial Support

     

    SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

     

    Bibliography

    • Morales, ATS 2009
    • Geva, JCMR 2011
    • Therrien, Am J Card 2005
    • Oosterhoff, Circ 2007
    • Gatzoulis et al, Circ 1995
    • Helbing et al, JACC 1996
    • Lee et al, Int J Card 2013
    • Maskatia, Cong Heart Disease 2015
    • Maskatia et al, Am J Card 2013
    • Chen et al, Am H Journal 2014
    • Cheung et al, Am J Card 2010
    • Wald et al, Circulation 2009
    • O’Meager et al, Heart Lung Circ 2014
    • Olive, Maskatia, et al, AHA scientific sessions 2014
    • Narayan et al, Circulation 2006
    • Chen et al, JACC Imaging 2016
    • JAMA 1945;128:189-202
    • Lillehei Surgery 1955;38:11-29
    • Bach, J Thor Cardiovasc Surgery 2001
    • Warnes et al, Circulation 2008;118:2395
    • Therrien et al. Am J Cardiol. 2005;95:779
    • Geva T JCMR 2011;13:9
    • Babu-Narayan et al, Circulation 2006;113:405
    • Broberg Circ Cardiovasc Imaging 2010;3:727
    • Oosterhoff T, et al Am Heart J 2005;151:265-272
    • Viegen HW et al Circulation 2002;106:1703-7
    • Henies IR et al Ann Thor Surg 2007;83:907-911
    • Oosterhoff et al Circulation 2007; 116:545-551
    • Geva T et al J Am Col Cardiol 2004;43:105874
    • Apitz C et al Lancet 2009;374:1462-71
    • Therrien J et al AM J Cardol 2005;95:779-82
    • Buechel ERV et al Eur Heart J 2005;25:2721-27
    • Apitz C, Webb GD, Redington AN, Lancet 2009;374:1462-71
    • Gatzoulis MA et al Circualtion 1995;81:1175-81
    • Redington AN et al Cardiol Young 1992;2:383-86
    • Grotenhuis HB, Kroft LJM et al 2006 Ch27 MRI and CT Higginside Roos (eds)
    • Van Straten et al Radiology 2004;233:824-29
    • Van Straten A et al JACC 2005;46:1559-1564
    • Van der Hulst AE et al Radiology 2010;256:724-734
    • Gartner RD et al J Thor Imag 2010;25:183-190
    • Oosterhoff et al Radiology 2005;237:868-371

     

    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Course Date: June 01, 2018

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 0.75 hours Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER Tetralogy of Fallot (CME)
    Collapse Transposition of the great arteries (CME)

    Purpose/ Objective

     

    Transposition of the great arteries is one form of congenital heart disease where standard non-invasive imaging techniques such as transthoracic echocardiography may not be able to fully characterize the underlying anatomy or ventricular function. This is particularly true in adult patients who have undergone surgical repair, either via the arterial switch or atrial switch procedures.  When performed with attention to certain details, CMR can improve the clinician’s understanding of the anatomy and resultant physiology in patients with TGA both prior to and following surgical repair. Following this activity, learners will understand the role of CMR in evaluating transposition of great arteries, be able provide examples of how CMR can help with functional evaluation in patients that have undergone surgical repair of TGA, and discuss protocols for CMR exam in patients transposition of great arteries, before and after surgical repair.

     

    Accreditation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Credit Designation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    Instructions for Claiming CME

     

    • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
    • Complete the post-activity evaluation
    • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

     

    Financial Disclosures

     

    The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose, unless listed below:
     

    Dr. Crean received research grants from Genzyme and Toshiba.

     

    Any resulting conflicts of interest were resolved prior to the start of the activity according to ACCME Criteria & Standards.

     

    Disclosure of Commercial Support

     

    SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

     

    Bibliography

    • Tobler, et al. Cardiac Outcomes in Young Adult Survivors of the Arterial Switch Operation for Transposition of the Great Arteries, Journal of the American College of Cardiology, vol 56, No 1, 2010
    • Manso, et al. Myocardial perfusion magnetic resonance imaging for detecting coronary function anomalies in asymptomatic paediatric patients with previous arterial switch operation for the transposition of great arteries, Cardiology in the Young (2010), 20, 410-417
    • Tobler et al, Evaluation of a comprehensive cardiovascular magnetic resonance protocal in young adults late after the arterial switch operations for d-transposition of the great arteries JCMR 2014, 16:98
    • Roman et al. Ped Radiol 2005
    • Buechel et al. JCMR 2009
    • Greil et al. JCMR 2007
    • Ho et al. Congenit Heart Dis 2012
    • Patek et al. Congenit Heart Dis 2011
    • Muzzarelli et al. J Thorac Imaging 2012
    • Gutberlet et al. Radiologe 2011
    • Brickner ME et al. NEJM (2000) 342;4
    • Hoffmann, Grothoff, Gulberlet, et al. 2011 unpuplished
    • Doctoral thesis Jamime Hoffmann and Homung , et al. Gatzoullis
    • Mussato, Wernovsky Cardiol Young 2005
    • Gutberlet et al. Radiology 214(200);467-475
    • Taylor et al. Radiology 2005

     

    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Course Date: June 01, 2018

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 0.75 hours Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER Transposition of the great arteries (CME)
    Collapse Kawasaki Disease and Vasculitis (CME)

    Purpose/ Objective

     

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute idiopathic form of childhood vasculitis that can result in coronary artery aneurysms.  Although it is one of the leading cause of acquired heart disease in children, KD sequelae can be difficult to assess by standard non-invasive imaging techniques. Takeyasu arteritis is also an idiopathic form of inflammatory vasculitis that more commonly affects larger arteries and is also difficult to assess by standard imaging techniques. CMR can improve the clinician’s understanding of coronary artery and vascular wall anatomy in patients with KD or vasculitis such as Takeyasu arteritis, particularly with regards to later sequelae of disease. Following this session, learners will better understand, what are the most common types of vascular diseases in children, how to assess coronary arteries by CMR in subjects with a history of Kawasaki Disease, and what are CMR characteristics of the vessel wall in Kawasaki Disease and in Takayasu arteritis.

     

    Accreditation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Credit Designation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    Instructions for Claiming CME

     

    • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
    • Complete the post-activity evaluation
    • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

     

    Financial Disclosures

     

    The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose.

     

    Disclosure of Commercial Support

     

    SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

     

    Bibliography

    • Jiang et al. International Journal of Cardiology 2012;115:262-267
    • Tangcharown T., Greil GF Radiology 2011;259(1):240-247
    • Tangcharown T. et al. Radiology 2011 April:259(1)
    • Greil GF et al. Circulation 2002;105;908-911
    • Mavrogeni S. JACC 2004;43(4):649-52
    • Suzuki A. Cardiol Young 2006 Dec;16(6):563-71
    • Hussain et al. JMRI 2011;34:279-285
    • Greil GF et al. Pediatr Radiol 2007;37:666-673
    • Hussain T et al. Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging 2013 Jan 1;6(1):91-8
    • Suzuki et al. Circulation 2000;101:2935-2941
    • Greil GF et al. JCMR 2007;9(1):49-56
    • Kim WY, Danias PG, Stuber M, et al.: N Engl J Med 2001;345(26):1863-1869
    • Miyagawa et al. Circulation 1998 Sep 8;98(10):990-6
    • Mavrogeni S. et al. Int J Cardiovase Imaging 2013 Aug 15
    • Oates-Whitehead RM, et al. IVIG for the treatment of KD in Children Cochrane Database System Rev. 2003;(4):CD004000
    • Weiss PF Pediatric Vasculitis Pediatr Clin North Am 2012 Apr;59(2):407-23
    • Jamieson N, Singh-Grewal D. Kawasaki Disease: A Clinician’s Update. Int J Pediatr 2013;2013:645391
    • Baumer JH, et al. Salicylate for the treatment of KD in Children Cochrane Datatbase Syst Rev 2006:(4):CD004175
    • Tacke CE et al. Circ CVI 2013;6:67-73
    • Tacke CE et al Circ CVI 2011;4:712-20
    • Mavrogeni S, et al. JACC CVI 2011;4:1140-1
    • Arend et al. Arthritis Rheum 1990;33:1129-34
    • Ginde et al. JACC 2012;59:e23
    • Andrews J and Mason JC Rheumatology 2007;46:6-15
    • Meini et al. Circulation 2006;114:e544
    • Gomik HL and Creager MA Circulation 2008;117:3039-3051
    • Keenan NG et al, Arthritis & Rheumatism 2009 Nov;60:3501-3509
    • Li et al. J Comput Assist Tomogr 2001;35:468-74
    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Course Date: June 01, 2018

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 0.50 hours Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER Kawasaki Disease and Vasculitis (CME)
    Collapse 4D flow in Congenital Heart Disease (CME)

    Purpose/ Objective

     

    Cardiovascular function is characterised by the highly integrated and synergistic coupling between the atrial, ventricular, and vascular compartments. The understanding of each individual component has substantially progressed from the molecular to the organ level; however, the direct in-vivo assessment of blood flow, which connects all compartments and plays an important role in the development of cardiovascular disease, remains challenging. Specifically, current imaging techniques are limited with respect to the assessment of certain features of blood flow, which is crucial for the comprehensive characterisation of cardiovascular haemodynamics, such as complex changes in three-dimensional (3D) blood flow patterns, pulsatile nature of arterial flow, flow beat-to-beat variability, blood pressure estimation, and flow quantification in small vessels. Following this activity, learners will be familiar with various 4D flow techniques, understand the clinical utility of 4D flow in congenital heart disease, and current challenges of performing 4D flow in congenital heart disease.

     

    Accreditation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Credit Designation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    Instructions for Claiming CME

     

    • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
    • Complete the post-activity evaluation
    • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

     

    Financial Disclosures

     

    The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose, unless listed below:
     

    Dr. Vasanawala has equity interest as a consultant in Arterys, received research grants as an independent contractor from GE Healthcare.

     

    Any resulting conflicts of interest were resolved prior to the start of the activity according to ACCME Criteria & Standards.

     

    Disclosure of Commercial Support

     

    SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

     

    Bibliography

    • Markl M, et al J Magn Reson Imaging 2007;25:824-831
    • Barker AJ, et al. Circ Cardiovasc Imaging 2012;5(4):457-466
    • Mahadevia R, et al. Circulation 2014;129:673-82
    • Stalder AF, et al. MRM 2008;60(5):1218-1231
    • Allen BD, at el. Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging 2013;14:399
    • Markl M, Et al. J Magn Reson Imaging 2012;5:933-937
    • Chowdhary V et al. Circulation 2015;131:1036-1038
    • Oshinski JN, et al J Magn Reson Imaging 1995;5(6):640-647
    • Oryre S et al Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg 1998;16(6):517-524
    • Harloff A et al. Magn Reson Med 2010;63(6):1529-1536
    • Frydrychowicz A, et al J Magn Reson Imaging 2009;30(1):77-84
    • Ebbers T, et al Biomech Eng 2002;124(3):288-293
    • Tyszka IM, et al J Magn Reson Imaging 2000;12(2):321-338
    • Bock J, et al Magn Reson Med 2011;66(4):1079-1088
    • Dyverfeldt P, et al Magn Reson Med 2006;56(4):850-858
    • Stalder AF, et al J Magn Reson Imaging 2011;33:839-846
    • Laffon E, et al J Magn Reson Imagin 2005;21(1):53-58
    • Markl M, et al Magn Reson Med 2010;63(6):1575-1582
    • Peng HH, et al J Magn Reson Imagin 2006;24(6):1303-1310
    • Vulliemaz S, et al Magn Reson Med 2002;47(4)):640-651
    • Hardy CJ, et al Magn Reson Med 1994;31(5):513-520

     

    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Course Date: June 01, 2018

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 0.50 hours Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER 4D flow in Congenital Heart Disease (CME)
    Collapse Black Blood Imaging (CME)

    Purpose/ Objective

    This course is to fill the void of the absebce of any self-assessment tools on Black Blood Imaging. Following this activity, learners will be able to assimilate the new information. To close the gap, learners will watch the recorded lectures and assimilate the new information.This CME activity is designed in order to improve learner comprehension of black blood sequences, in order to help optimize clinical CMR acquisition.

     

    Accreditation Statement

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Credit Designation Statement

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    Instructions for Claiming CME

    • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought.
    • Complete the post-activity evaluation.
    • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted.

     

    Planning Committee Members

    Michael DiMaria and Christopher Lam

     

    Financial Disclosures

    The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose.

     

    Any resulting conflicts of interest were resolved prior to the start of the activity according to ACCME Criteria & Standards.

     

    Disclosure of Commercial Support

    SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Course Date: December 10, 2019

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 0.50 hours Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER Black Blood Imaging (CME)
    Collapse Blood Flow Measurement (CME)

    Purpose/ Objective

     

    Eddy currents and phase offsets remain longstanding technical challenges that introduce measurement error across all phase-contrast approaches, including the advanced methods presented here. These errors, which manifest as phase shifts on a regional, global, and temporal basis, will compromise the ability to accurately quantify integrated parameters such as stroke volume. A number of studies have investigated various correction approaches; however, there is no widespread agreement as to a universal correction protocol. The lack of standardized analysis tools for regional flow quantification and analysis of PC data is a major hurdle for their more widespread clinical application. To further the availability of these techniques and facilitate their translation into the clinic, workflow efforts towards standardisation across different MRI vendor platforms and data analysis software are warranted. Following this activity, learners will understand the basics of phase-contrast imaging along with prospective and retrospective gating techniques, be able to describe the errors and limitations associated with phase-contrast imaging, and discuss clinical validation of flow in congenital heart disease

     

    Accreditation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Credit Designation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    Instructions for Claiming CME

     

    • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
    • Complete the post-activity evaluation
    • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

     

    Financial Disclosures

     

    The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose.

     

    Disclosure of Commercial Support

     

    SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

     

    Bibliography

    • Fratz et al JCMR 2013 15:51

     

    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Course Date: June 01, 2018

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 0.75 hours Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER Blood Flow Measurement (CME)
    Collapse Contrast-Enhanced MRA (CME)

    Purpose/ Objective

    A knowledge gap in MRI topics such as CE MRA exists due to not having easily outlined and identified online courses available to trainees. The SCMR Education Committee intends to address and improve the overall online education experience, by identifying appropriate course material and making these courses more readily available. Following this activity, learns will:

    1. Understand the indications for CE MRA

    2. Understand the benefits and limitations of CE MRA

     

    PLANNING COMMITTEE MEMBERS

    Deane Yim

     

    Presenters

    • Dr Taylor Chung

    • Dr Gerald Greil

    • Dr Sebastein Kelle

    The planners/faculty for this activity have no relevant relationships to disclose. 

     

    Accreditation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Credit Designation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    Instructions for Claiming CME

     

    • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
    • Complete the post-activity evaluation
    • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

     

    Financial Disclosures

     

    The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose, unless listed below:
     

     

     

    Any resulting conflicts of interest were resolved prior to the start of the activity according to ACCME Criteria & Standards.

     

    Disclosure of Commercial Support

     

    SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Course Date: December 19, 2019

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 0.75 hours Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER Contrast-Enhanced MRA (CME)
    Collapse Imaging Young Patients (CME)

    Decription

     

    This educational activity consists of a set of four talks addressing several aspects of imaging young patients. This activity gives the learner in depth insight into the unique challenges involved with imaging children: from technical to logistics of multi-disciplinary team, salient clinical pointers, understanding of quality improvement in congenital CMR imaging and strategies to address the challenges of imaging young patients.

     

    Purpose/ Objective

     

    Imaging of young patients is complicated, has its unique set of challenges, and requires a multi-disciplinary team to image young patients safely and successfully. Awareness of the needs and challenges of imaging young patients, knowledge of the strategies to address the above can help those develop safe and efficient practices, enable and empower multi-disciplinary teams to excel in the care of young patients and improve the quality of these processes.

    Imaging young patients is often anxiety provoking for the CMR team in view of the challenges encountered at each stage of imaging such as getting good quality images, frequent need for anesthesia, congenital and pediatric specific pathology and knowledge of pediatric specific aspects during interpretation. Insight into the above and learning strategies to implement when imaging the young patients is vital for patient care and quality improvement. Following this activity, the CMR team will be well prepared to image young patients and addressing possible challenges that may be encountered, thus leading to improved image quality, patient care, and potentially decrease scan time.

     

    PLANNING COMMITTEE MEMBERS

    Divya Shakti, MD, MPH; Christopher Lam, MD

     

    Presenters

    • Romina Linton  
    • Piers Barker  
    • Ahmed Kharabish  
    • Nadine Choueiter

    The planners/faculty for this activity have no relevant relationships to disclose. 

     

    Accreditation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Credit Designation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    Instructions for Claiming CME

     

    • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
    • Complete the post-activity evaluation
    • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

     

    Financial Disclosures

     

    The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose, unless listed below:

     

    Any resulting conflicts of interest were resolved prior to the start of the activity according to ACCME Criteria & Standards.

     

    Disclosure of Commercial Support

     

    SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

     

    Bibliography and Resources:

    1. J P G van der Ven, Z Sadighy, E R Valsangiacomo Buechel, S Sarikouch, D Robbers-Visser, C J Kellenberger, T Kaiser, P Beerbaum, E Boersma, W A Helbing, Multicentre reference values for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging derived ventricular size and function for children aged 0–18 years, European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 21, Issue 1, January 2020, Pages 102–113, https://doi.org/10.1093/ehjci/jez164
    2. Sarikouch S, Peters B, Gutberlet M, Leismann B, Kelter-Kloepping A, Koerperich H et al.  Sex-specific pediatric percentiles for ventricular size and mass as reference values for cardiac MRI: assessment by steady-state free-precession and phase-contrast MRI flow. Circ Cardiovasc Imaging 2010;3:65–76.
    3. Robbers-Visser D, Boersma E, Helbing WA. Normal biventricular function, volumes, and mass in children aged 8 to 17 years. J Magn Reson Imaging 2009;29:552–9.
    4. Buechel EV, Kaiser T, Jackson C, Schmitz A, Kellenberger CJ. Normal right- and left ventricular volumes and myocardial mass in children measured by steady state free precession cardiovascular magnetic resonance. J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2009;11:19.
    5. Ntsinjana HN, Hughes ML, Taylor AM. The role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in pediatric congenital heart disease. J Cardiovasc Magn Reson. 2011;13(1):51. Published 2011 Sep 21. doi:10.1186/1532-429X-13-51
    6. Valsangiacomo Buechel ER, Grosse-Wortmann L, Fratz S, Eichhorn J, Sarikouch S, Greil GF, Beerbaum P, Bucciarelli-Ducci C, Bonello B, Sieverding L, Schwitter J,  Helbing WA; EACVI, Galderisi M, Miller O, Sicari R, Rosa J, Thaulow E, Edvardsen  T, Brockmeier K, Qureshi S, Stein J. Indications for cardiovascular magnetic resonance in children with congenital and acquired heart disease: an expert consensus paper of the Imaging Working Group of the AEPC and the Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Section of the EACVI. Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2015 Mar;16(3):281-97. doi: 10.1093/ehjci/jeu129. Epub 2015 Feb 17. PubMed PMID: 25712078.
    7. Fratz S, Chung T, Greil GF, Samyn MM, Taylor AM, Valsangiacomo Buechel ER, Yoo SJ, Powell AJ. Guidelines and protocols for cardiovascular magnetic resonance in  children and adults with congenital heart disease: SCMR expert consensus group on congenital heart disease. J Cardiovasc Magn Reson. 2013 Jun 13;15:51. doi: 10.1186/1532-429X-15-51. PubMed PMID: 23763839; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3686659.
    8. Bonnemains L, Raimondi F, Odille F. Specifics of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in children. Arch Cardiovasc Dis. 2016 Feb;109(2):143-9. doi: 10.1016/j.acvd.2015.11.004. Epub 2016 Jan 14. Review. PubMed PMID: 26778085.
    9. SCMR Survey of Centers Performing CMR in Pediatric/Congenital Heart Disease, September 20, 2014. Prepared by Andrew J. Powell, MD, on behalf of the?SCMR Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Executive Committee.
    10. Presentations from SCMR annual scientific sessions:
    • Imaging the Pediatric Patient. Speaker: Romina Linton  SCMR 2015
    • Pediatric CMR: Non congenital paediatric imaging. Speaker: Piers Barker, SCMR 2017.
    • Quality Improvement in congenital CMR imaging. Speaker: Nadine Choueiter, SCMR 2018.
    • Congenital 2. Speaker: Ahmed Kharabish, SCMR 2018
    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Course Date: December 17, 2019

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1 hour Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER Imaging Young Patients (CME)
    Collapse Interventional CMR (CME)

    Purpose/ Objective

     

    Interventional cardiovascular magnetic resonance (iCMR) promises to enable radiation-free catheterization procedures and to enhance contemporary image guidance for structural heart and electrophysiological interventions. However, clinical translation of exciting pre-clinical interventions has been limited by availability of devices that are safe to use in the magnetic resonance (MR) environment. We discuss challenges and solutions for clinical translation, including MR-conditional and MR-safe device design, and how to configure an interventional suite. We review the recent advances that have already enabled diagnostic MR right heart catheterization and simple electrophysiologic ablation to be performed in humans and explore future clinical applications. Following this activity, learns will understand the current advances in interventional cardiac MRI, will be able to discuss challenges with interventional cardiac MRI, and the future directions of interventional cardiac MRI.

     

    Accreditation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Credit Designation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    Instructions for Claiming CME

     

    • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
    • Complete the post-activity evaluation
    • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

     

    Financial Disclosures

     

    The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose, unless listed below:
     

    Dr. Ratnayaka received research support from Siemens Medical Solutions.

    Dr. Muthurangu received research support from Siemens Medical Solutions.

    Dr. Wright received reserach support from GE Healthcare and Imricor.

     

    Any resulting conflicts of interest were resolved prior to the start of the activity according to ACCME Criteria & Standards.

     

    Disclosure of Commercial Support

     

    SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

     

    Bibliography

    • Dick, Circulation 2003
    • Dexter, Journ Clin Invest 1947
    • Preclinical; Raval, Circulation 2005
    • Dori, Circ Imaging, 2011
    • Gutiérrez, CCI 2007
    • Peters, Radiology 2007
    • Kolandaivelu, CircEP 2010
    • Sommer, Europace 2013
    • Ratnayaka, Eur Heart J, 2012
    • Kahlert, JACC 2012
    • Ratnayaka, JACCInter 2011
    • Razzavi et al Lancet 2003
    • Muthuranger et al Circulation 2004
    • Celik et al, Talk O17, SCMR 2013
    • Ramanan et al. Talk O87, SCMR 2013
    • Overall et al. ISMRM 2007 #1117
    • Hansen, NIH
    • Biswas – Sunnybrook
    • Lu, Radau – Sunnybrook
    • Xu R et al, ISBI 2013
    • Anderson K et al. ISMRM 2013
    • Oduneye S et al IEEE Trans Biomed Eng, Sept 2013
    • M Guttman, NIH, JHU
    • AJ Dick, Circulation 2004
    • Pan et al An Integrated System for Catheter Tracking and Visualization in MR-Guided Cardiovascular Interventions, accepted to ISMRM 2011
    • Karim et al, FIMH 2011
    • Peters et al MICCAI 2007
    • Marrouche, Utah; Peters, Haverad; Schaeffter, London
    • Geers et al. STACOM II, Cardiac Motion Analysis Challenge, MICCAI 2011

     

    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Course Date: June 01, 2018

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 0.75 hours Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER Interventional CMR (CME)
    Collapse Navigator 3D SSFP Whole Heart Imaging (CME)

    Purpose/ Objective

    Volumetric imaging of the whole heart and the great vessels is very important for surgical planning and clinical decision making, particularly in complex congenital heart diseases. However, volumetric imaging is challenging due to presence of respiratory and cardiac motion. Gadolinium contrast injection is still a concern for patients with severe renal impairment and contrast allergy, as well as the need for intravenous cannulation. With use of a navigator 3D SSFP sequence, volumetric bright blood imaging can be achieved without the need for contrast injection. However, this sequence is still limited by the intrinsic limitations of SSFP sequences (e.g. presence of dephasing artifacts in regions with turbulence) and the need for additional scanning time due to dual gating. Volumetric imaging of the whole heart and the great vessels is very important for surgical planning and clinical decision making, particularly in complex congenital heart diseases. However, as the heart is beating and the diaphragms are moving, respiratory and ECG navigation must be performed to minimize motion artifacts. With use of a balanced SSFP sequence, bright blood imaging can be achieved without the need for contrast injection.

    Following this activity, learns will understand the following about the sequence:

    1. Understand the underlying technical principles of the sequence
    2. Understand the usual technical parameters used and the background principles.
    3. Understand the limitations of the sequence.
    4. Understand the common applications.

     

    Planners

    Kenneth Cheung and Christopher Lam

     

    Accreditation Statement

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Credit Designation Statement

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    Instructions for Claiming CME

    • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
    • Complete the post-activity evaluation
    • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

     

    Financial Disclosures

    The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose, unless listed below:

    Nothing to Disclose

     

    Any resulting conflicts of interest were resolved prior to the start of the activity according to ACCME Criteria & Standards.

     

    Disclosure of Commercial Support

    SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

     

    Bibliography

    Uribe S, Tangchaoren T, Parish V, Wolf I, Razavi R, Greil G, Schaeffter T. Volumetric cardiac quantification by using 3D dual-phase whole-heart MR imaging. Radiology. 2008 Aug;248(2):606-14. SCMR Standardized Imaging Protocols 2020 Update Kramer CM, Barkhausen J, Bucciarelli-Ducci C, Flamm SD, Kim RJ, Nagel E. Standardized cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) protocols: 2020 update. J Cardiovasc Magn Reson. 2020 Feb 24;22(1):17.

    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Course Date: March 27, 2020

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 0.50 hours Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER Navigator 3D SSFP Whole Heart Imaging (CME)
    Collapse Tissue characterization (CME)

    Purpose/ Objective

     

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is a well-established noninvasive imaging modality in clinical cardiology. Its unsurpassed accuracy in defining cardiac morphology and function and its ability to provide tissue characterization make it well suited for the study of patients with cardiac diseases. Late gadolinium enhancement was a major advancement in the development of tissue characterization techniques, allowing the unique ability of CMR to differentiate ischemic heart disease from nonischemic cardiomyopathies. Using T2-weighted techniques, areas of edema and inflammation can be identified in the myocardium. A new generation of myocardial mapping techniques are emerging, enabling direct quantitative assessment of myocardial tissue properties in absolute terms. This review will summarize recent developments involving T1-mapping and T2-mapping techniques and focus on the clinical applications and future potential of these evolving CMR methodologies. Following this activity, learners will understand various qualitative and quantitative techniques used for tissue characterization, be able to discuss clinical utility of T1 mapping techniques, and describe the errors and limitations associated with tissue characterisation MRI techniques.

     

    Accreditation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Credit Designation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    Instructions for Claiming CME

     

    • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
    • Complete the post-activity evaluation
    • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

     

    Financial Disclosures

     

    The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose, unless listed below:
     

    Dr. Ugander received research grants from Siemens and is a member on the advisory/review panel for Aten Porus Live Science.

     

    Any resulting conflicts of interest were resolved prior to the start of the activity according to ACCME Criteria & Standards.

     

    Disclosure of Commercial Support

     

    SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

     

    Bibliography

    • Mahrhold et al. Eur Heart J 2002
    • Risenkamort et al. Circulation CV Imaging 2015
    • Kellman & Hansen JCMR 2014
    • Moon et al. JCMR 2013, 15:92
    • M. Puddechar Principles of magnetic resonance imaging
    • He et al J Magn Reson Imaging 2013
    • Messroghli DR, et al. Reson Med 2004, 52:141-6
    • Higgins DM, et al, Medical Physics 2005;32(6):1738
    • Chow K, et al, Magn Reson Med 2013;000:1-14
    • Ugander M, et al, Eur Heart J 2012
    • Mewton N, et al. Assessment of Myocardial Fibrosis with Cardiovascualr Magnetic Resonance J Am Coll Cardio 2011 Feb 22;57(8):891-903
    • Kellman P, et al. Extracellular volume fraction mapping in the myocardium, Part 2: Ibutak Ckubucak Exoeruebce J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2012, 14:64
    • Giri S, et al. T2 quantification for improved detection of myocardial edema J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2009 Dec 30;11:56 doiL 10.1186/1532-429X-11-56
    • Steel K, Circulation, 2009
    • Grün S, et al. JACC, 2012
    • O’Hanlon R, JACC, 2010
    • Higgins CB, et al. 1983 AM J Cardio
    • Ugander M, et al. JACC Cardiovasc Imaging, 2012
    • Ferreira VM, JACC CI, 2013
    • Sado D, JMRI 2014
    • Ugander M, et al. Eur Heart J 2012
    • Flett A, et al. Circulation 2010
    • Schelbert EB, et al. Circulation 2012

     

    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Course Date: June 01, 2018

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1 hour Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER Tissue characterization (CME)
    Collapse Ventricular Function (CME)

    Purpose/ Objective

     

    CMR assessment of global and regional ventricular function presents particular challenges in subjects with simple and complex congenital heart disease. There are several specific techniques that could be used to maximize the accuracy and reproducibility of ventricular function assessment. Clinicians must also know under what circumstances these measurements may be limited, common pitfalls in this assessment, and how to best apply these CMR techniques in the care of patients with congenital heart disease. Following this activity, learns will understand assessment of regional and global systolic ventricular function using cardiac MRI techniques, learn to avoid common pitfalls in the assessment of right and left ventricular systolic function and understand the challenges with assessment of ventricular function in complex congenital heart disease.

     

    Accreditation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Credit Designation Statement

     

    The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    Instructions for Claiming CME

     

    • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
    • Complete the post-activity evaluation
    • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

     

    Financial Disclosures

     

    The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relevant relationships to disclose, unless listed below:
     

    Dr. Samyn is an employee and received salary from GE Healthcare. She has equity and/or stock options in Philips Healthcare and Siemens Medical Solutions.

     

    Any resulting conflicts of interest were resolved prior to the start of the activity according to ACCME Criteria & Standards.

     

    Disclosure of Commercial Support

     

    SCMR received no funding to support this activity.

     

    Bibliography

    • Int J Clin Practice 2009, 63, 20-35
    • Kilner PI, et al. European Heart Journal, 31:794, 2010
    • Comparison of Accuracy of Axial Slices Versus Short-Axis Slices for Measuring Ventricular Volumes by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance in Patients With Corrected Tetralogy of Fallot Fratz S., Schuhbaeck A., Buchner C., Busch R., Meierhofer C., Martinoff S., Hess J., Stern H. (2009) American Journal of Cardiology, 103 (12), pp. 1764-1769.
    • Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and the assessment of Ebstein anomaly in adults Yalonetsky S., Tobler D., Greutmann M., Crean A.M., Wintersperger B.J., Nguyen E.T., Oechslin E.N., (...), Wald R.M. (2011) American Journal of Cardiology, 107 (5), pp. 767-773.
    • The functional right ventricle and tricuspid regurgitation in Ebstein's anomaly Fratz S., Janello C., Muller D., Seligmann M., Meierhofer C., Schuster T., Schreiber C., (...), Stern H. (2013) International Journal of Cardiology, 167 (1), pp. 258-261.
    • Comparison of interstudy reproducibility of cardiovascular magnetic resonance with two-dimensional echocardiography in normal subjects and in patients with heart failure or left ventricular hypertrophy. Grothues F1, Smith GC, Moon JC, Bellenger NG, Collins P, Klein HU, Pennell DJ. American Journal of Cardiology, 2002 Jul 1;90(1):29-34.
    • Schulz-Menger et al, 2013 JCMR, 15(1),1.
    • Suinesiaputra et al, 2015 JCMR, vol 17(1) p.63
    • Beerbaum et al. 2009 JMRI, 30(5), 956-966
    • Masood JMRI 2000; 12:873-833
    • Orwart et al. 2015 Heart Epub Ahead of Print
    • Fratz S, et al Guidelines and Protocols for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Children and Adults with Congenital Heart Disease: SCMR Expert Consensus Group on Congenital Heart Disease. JCMR 2013 Jun 13;15:51
    • Slavin GS & Bluemke DA. 2005 Radiology; 234:330-338
    • Luijnenburg SE, et al. Intra-observer & inter-observer variability of biventricular function, volumes & mass in patients with CHD measured by CMR imaging (1) Int J Cardiovasc Imaging 2010;26:57-64
    • Bonnemains L, et al. Assessment of RV Volumes & Fuction by Cardiac MRI: Quantification of the Regional & Global Interobserver Variability (1) Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 2012;67:1740-1746
    • Alfakih K, Plein S, Thiele H, Jones T, Ridgway JP, Sivananthan MU: Normal human left and right ventricular dimensions for MRI as assessed by turbo gradient echo and steady-state free precession imaging sequesnce, J Magn Reson Imaging 2003;17:323-329
    • Buechel EV, Kaiser T, Jackson C, Schmitz A, Kellenberger CJ: Normal right and left ventricular volumes and myocardial mass in children measured by steady state free precession cardiovascular magnetic resonace. JCMR 2009; 11:19
    • Hudsmith LE, Petersen SE, Francis JM, Robson MD, Neubauer S: Normal human left and right ventricular and left atrial dimensions using steady state free precession magnetic resonance imaging. JCMR 2005;7:755-782
    • Robbers-Visser D, Boersma E, Helbing WA: Normal biventricular function, volumes, and mass in children aged 8 to 17 years. JCMR 2009;29:552-559
    • Sarikouch S, Peters B, Gutberlet M, Leismann B, Kelter-Kloepping A, Koerperich H, Kuehne T, Beerbaum P: Sex-specific pediatric percentiles for ventricular size and mass as reference values for cardiac MRI: assessment by steady-state free-precession and phase-contrast MRI flow. Circ Cardiovasc Imaging 2010;3:65-76
    • Buechel ER, Dave HH, Kellenberger CL, Dodge-Khataml A, Pretre R, Berger F, Bauersfeld U: Remodelling of the right ventricle after rearly pulmonary valve replacement in children with repaired tetralogy of fallot: assessment by cardiovascular magnetic resonance European Heart Journal 2005;26:2721-2727
    • Grothues F, Moon JC, Bellenger NG, Smith GS, Klein HU, Pennell DJ. Interstudy reproducibility of right ventricular volumens, function and mass with cardiovascular magnetic resonance. AM Heart J 2004;147:218-223
    • Aldakih et al., J Magn Reson Imaging 2003;18(1):25-32
    • Fratz et al., AM J Cardiol, 2009:103(12):1764-9
    • Vogel-Claussen et al., J Comput Assist Tomogr. 2006;30(3):426-32
    • Maceria et al. Eur Heart J 2006
    • Grothues et al., Am Heart J. 2004;147(2):218-23 

     

    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Course Date: June 01, 2018

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1 hour Total General Hours

  • REGISTERREGISTER Ventricular Function (CME)