JCMR 2020;22:14. Sub-segmental quantification of single (stress)-pass perfusion CMR improves the diagnostic accuracy for detection of obstructive coronary artery disease (CME)

Purpose/ Objective

Myocardial perfusion with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is an established diagnostic test for evaluation of myocardial ischaemia. For quantification purposes, however, the 16 segment American Heart Association (AHA) model poses limitations in terms of extracting relevant information on the extent/severity of ischaemia as perfusion deficits will not always fall within an individual segment, which reduces its diagnostic value, and makes an accurate assessment of outcome data or a result comparison across various studies difficult. The article will therefore focus on how subsegmentation of the myocardium improves diagnostic accuracy and facilitates an objective cut-off-based description of hypoperfusion.

What is the ideal state/ if the The 16 segment American Heart Association (AHA) model poses limitations in terms of extracting relevant information on the extent/severity of ischaemia as perfusion deficits will not always fall within an individual segment, which reduces its diagnostic value, and makes an accurate assessment of outcome data or a result comparison across various studies difficult. By further dividing the myocardial segments into epi- and endocardial layers and a further circumferential subdivision, the accuracy of detecting myocardial hypoperfusion is improved.problem is gone?

 

Following this activity, learners will be aware of the advantages / disadvantages of the different subsegmentation approaches and they will understand how to use the 96 (sub-)subsegments approach.

 

This activity was designed to make the learner familiar with the advantages / disadvantages of subsegmentation approaches based on transmural segments (16 AHA and 48 segments) vs. subdivision into epi- and endocardial (32) subsegments vs. further circumferential subdivision into 96 (sub-)subsegments.

 

Accreditation Statement
The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

 

Credit Designation Statement
The Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) designates this Journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

 

Instructions for Claiming CME

  • Attend the sessions in full for which credit is sought
  • Complete the post-activity evaluation
  • A certificate of completion will be available once the evaluation is submitted

 

Financial Disclosures
The planners and faculty for this activity did not have any relationships to disclose.

 

Disclosure of Commercial Support
SCMR received funding to support this activity from the following organizations: None.

 

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Course Information
Course Date:
August 24, 2020
Article " Sub-segmental quantification of single (stress)-pass perfusion CMR improves the diagnostic accuracy for detection of obstructive coronary artery disease"
Individual topic purchase: Selected
Accreditation Council For Continuing Medical Education
Total General Hours: 1.00
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Non-Member Price:$10.00